Shedding

“Although shedding is difficult for all of us, for a woman to shed what has falsely hidden her more authentic experience is a great liberation. The freedom felt after the loss of persona is spiritually nourishing, and the creativity released from within can be enormous, allowing her to create herself in a more ‘true’ form. This is the process I am calling female shamanism—an ongoing shedding of false selves in favor of the active development of more authentic forms of expression.”
“The snake is the ancient totem of women all over the world and speaks to the lunar nature of feminine biological evolution. A woman’s natural timing is cyclical, circular, spiral, nonlinear, and nonrational. Women need to replace their crystllized identities, as these shatter or dissolve through the shamanic process, with a deliberately fluid ego-identity. If a woman can begin to appreciate and cultivate the value of an identity that is always changing, continually in flux, never completely solid, she begins to align with what shamans and Buddhists describe as ‘reality.’ Those with the sight to see into the world of energy, see that everythong is made of energy, and energy is always in motion. The rest of the world is practicing to become able to accept and tolerate this vision of reality, which is in conflict with the one we were originally taught to believe.”
~ Vicki Noble from Shakti Woman: Feeling Our Fire, Healing Our World – The New Female Shamanism

Shed skins in favor of more authentic forms~ | MYSTICMAMMA.COM : consciousness, spirituality, wisdom, inspiration.

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Neurodiversity Rewires Conventional Thinking About Brains | Wired Magazine | Wired.com

Neurodiversity Rewires Conventional Thinking About Brains | Wired Magazine | Wired.com.

“In the late 1990s, a sociologist named Judy Singer—who is on the autism spectrum herself—invented a new word to describe conditions like autism, dyslexia, and ADHD: neurodiversity. In a radical stroke, she hoped to shift the focus of discourse about atypical ways of thinking and learning away from the usual litany of deficits, disorders, and impairments. Echoing positive terms like biodiversity and cultural diversity, her neologism called attention to the fact that many atypical forms of brain wiring also convey unusual skills and aptitudes.”

Bacterial Brain

‎”We are inhabited by as many as 10,000 bacterial species; these cells outnumber those which we consider our own by 10 to 1, and weigh, all told, about 3 pounds- the same as our brain. Together, they are referred to as our microbiome and they play such a crucial role in our lives that scientists have begun to reconsider what it means to be human.”